ISIS bride Shamima Begum NOT allowed back to Britain, rules Supreme Court

ISIS bride Shamima Begum should not be allowed to come back to the UK from Syria to challenge the decision to strip her of her British citizenship, the Supreme Court ruled on Friday.

Announcing the judgment, President of the Supreme Court, Lord Reed was critical of the Court of Appeal which had ruled in Begum’s favour and insisted: “The right of a fair hearing does not trump all other considerations, such as safety of public.”


Sajid Javid, the Home Secretary at the time Begum was stripped of her British citizenship tweeted saying he “strongly welcomed” the ruling.

“The Home Secretary is responsible for the security of our citizens and borders, and therefore should have the power to decide whether anyone posing a serious threat to that security can enter our country.

“There are no simple solutions to this situation, but any restrictions of rights and freedoms faced by this individual are a direct consequence of the extreme actions that she and others have taken, in violation of government guidance and common morality,” Javid concluded.

Begum left Britain in 2015 with two other schoolgirls to join the Islamic State. When asked in an interview with Sky News if she was aware of beheadings conducted by IS, Begum replied: “Yeah, I knew about those things and I was okay with it… From what I heard, Islamically that is allowed. So I was okay with it.”


In the same interview, she pleaded with the public for sympathy. “I think a lot of people should have, like, sympathy towards me for everything I’ve been through.”

A YouGov poll from November showed that 70% of Brits did not think she should be allowed to return.

Their opinion was recently echoed by the UK’s top anti-terror officer Neil Basu, who backed the government’s decision to exclude Begum from Britain.

Referring to the problems the police already face with home-grown terror threats, counter-terror chief Basu said: “I don’t need to import a greater problem.”

His opinion wasn’t shared by prominent members of the Labour Party according to an opinion piece from 2019 when then-shadow home secretary Diane Abbott called for the “desperate groomed teenager” to be allowed to “return home”, insisting there were “plenty of good reasons” to allow her to do so.