Met Police boss slammed for anti-white discrimination push

Metropolitan Police Commissioner Dame Cressida Dick has been blasted after it was reported she was pushing for a change in the law so she could utilise so-called “positive discrimination” to boost the number of non-white cops in London.

A Home Office source has now fired back, saying: “It’s fair to say positive discrimination is illegal for a reason.” They also went on to add that there was “no need for positive discrimination to increase the diversity of the police”.


She’s been blasted from a variety of quarters over the plans, with some highlighting the fact that “positive discrimination” effectively means discrimination against white people while others question whether or not it is demeaning to hold members of Britain’s ethnic minority communities to lower standards.

Members of the public have been disgusted at the idea too, with one saying: “Can you imagine the outrage if Cressida Dick called for laws allowing discrimination in favour of white candidates? Well, why aren’t you every bit as angry when it’s the other way around? She wants it to be legal to discriminate against white people. Astounding.”

Others have pointed out how patronising the move is, with MP Bob Blackman saying: “You employ the best person for the job, and you encourage people from all walks of life to come forward.


“But to then say you are going to positively discriminate for one set of people over another, you are saying to those people you are inferior. I regard that as an insult to people of different minority communities.

“It is demeaning. It says you are not good enough to get there on your own merits.”

And former Tory boss Iain Duncan Smith chimed in too: “Don’t you want to get the best? It is a bit degrading really to be told the only way you get very good people from ethnic backgrounds is by accepting lower standards.

“I have met lots and lots of people in the police of a very high standard from ethnic communities. They want to be treated the same as everybody else.

“They have a target to get higher ethnic participation – that is great. But the way to do that is to go out and convince people from school onwards that having a career in the police is a good thing to do.”